Veal Milanese

This post may contain affiliate links.  For more information, read my disclosure policy here  

No ratings yet
Veal Milanese is a fried breaded veal cutlet that is crispy and tender and a classic dish from the Milan region of Italy. It is fast and easy dish that is also elegant and a beautiful dinner.
Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 12 minutes
Veal Milanese

Veal Milanese is a fried breaded veal cutlet that is crispy and tender. A classic dish from the Milan region of Italy. It is fast and easy dish that is also elegant and a beautiful dinner.

 Veal Milanese

This post is sponsored by Veal, Discover Delicious, funded by Beef Farmers and Ranchers. All opinions are 100% my own.  

Veal Milanese (Cotoletta alla Milanese) is one of the most famous dishes of traditional Italian cuisine. It was made for the first time in Milan in the early 1100’s by monks. Milanese veal cutlet is made from the loin.

If you wish to find more spectacular Italian dishes and check this link.


MORE VEAL RECIPES YOU MIGHT LIKE

Mongolian pork on plate
Get Our Top 5 Quick & Easy Recipes

Get our best easy recipes delivered straight to your inbox.

Veal Mexican Stuffed Shells | Veal Cheeseburger Macaroni | Veal Piccata Meatballs


What We Love About This Italian Veal Recipes

  • 30 Minute Meal: A quick dinner any night of the week.
  • Easy Ingredients: Only 5 ingredient and so very easy.
  • Adaptable: Can make it low-carb or dairy free.
  • Serve: Side dishes of salad, pasta, risotto or anything you like.
Cutlets spread out on a white dish.

Ingredient Notes for Veal Milanese

  • Veal: Make sure the cutlets are pounded thin. You can also use a veal chop for this recipe, but again, pound it very thin – about ¼ inch thick.
  • All Purpose Seasoning: A blend of seasonings, salt and black pepper.
  • Eggs: Four large eggs for the batter.
  • Plain Bread Crumbs: These breadcrumbs make a crispy coating.
  • Olive Oil: Just a light amount to fry the veal.
  • Flour: All purpose flour for dredging.
  • Lemon: Cut into wedges. The lemon juice brightens the dish.
Cutlets, lemon, eggs, breadcrumbs and seasoning.

Equipment Needed

How to Make Veal Milanese

These are the basic steps for making veal milanese recipe. Please refer to the recipe card below for more detailed instructions.

Doing the coating process of flour, egg then breadcrumb and then baked.

STEP 1: PREP

First, preheat the oven. Next mix the flour and Italian Seasoning Blend to a shallow dish. Beat eggs and pour into a shallow dish. Pour breadcrumbs and 1 teaspoon of All Purpose Seasoning Blend into a third shallow dish; Set aside

STEP 2: COAT

Then, dip each cutlet into the egg mixture, ensuring both sides are coated.Last, dip each cutlet into the bread crumb mixture, ensuring both sides are fully coated. You may need to press the crumbs onto the veal. Set prepared cutlets on a large plate.

STEP 3: FRY

Pour oil into a large skillet over medium-high heat and heat it until the oil is shimmering. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes per side. Remove the veal from the pan to a rimmed baking sheet fitted with a wire rack and place in the preheated oven. Repeat the process with the remaining cutlets.

STEP 4: LEMON

Right before serving, squirt each cutlet with a lemon wedge.

What is Veal?

Wondering what is veal meat? I’ve been on several veal farm tours and learned a lot about this industry. Veal is the meat from an adolescent cow. When veal is processed, the veal calf weighs approximately 500 pounds. In comparison to other meats, veal calves are typically the same age as poultry – such as chicken and turkeys.

Some other questions I’ve been asked about veal include:

  • What animal is veal?  Young cows. Veal is a more delicate and tender version of beef.
  • Is veal beef? Essentially, yes. However, the texture is more tender, the color is much lighter and the flavor is more mild.
  • What does veal taste like? Veal meat is very tender with a light, delicate beef flavor.
  • Is veal lamb? No. Lamb is a young sheep, whereas veal is a young male bull.

Where Does Veal Come From?

There are about 500 veal farm families across the US that raise veal in areas such as Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York, Michigan, Indiana and Wisconsin.

Veal actually starts on dairy farms. In most cases, veal calves are Holstein male (or bull) calves born on dairy farms. Bull calves are sold from the dairy farm because they cannot produce milk. Some of these bull calves are bought and raised on veal farms.

Veal farms are extremely focused on the health and safety of their herds. Once a calf is born, they are housed in individual pens during the first few weeks. This is done to protect vulnerable new calves from sickness because they are born with little to no immunities.

After about 8 weeks, when they’ve had time to develop their immune systems, the calves are grouped together in group housing. They always have plenty of space to stand up, lay down, turn around and socialize with other calves. Sometimes, you may notice calves or cows standing close together. This is because, as herding animals, they feel more comfortable when standing close together.

Wondering where to buy veal?  Veal.org has a listing of online, local and in-store options.

Why Veal is a Great Protein Source

Over the past few years, I’ve been experimenting with several veal cuts, including veal scallopini or cutlets (that I used in this recipe), veal chops, ground veal and even veal short ribs. Because of its delicate flavor, it’s great with many different flavorings.

Package of veal scallopini cutlets

I often get asked how to cook veal. You cook just like you would beef or pork. You can grill it, fry it, bake it, even smoke it. It’s a great substitution for many of your favorite recipes. And, because the meat is naturally tender, your recipes turn out tender too.

One of the biggest benefits of veal is it’s a high-quality protein source that provides essential vitamins and minerals like vitamin B-12, niacin, zinc, and selenium. It’s also one of the most nutrient-dense protein foods around.  A 3-ounce serving of cooked, trimmed lean veal has 27 grams of protein and just about 170 calories.

I have some great veal recipes including Veal Picatta MeatballsVeal Cheeseburger Macaroni and Veal Mexican Stuffed Shells.

Prep and Storage Tips for this Veal Milanese Recipe

HOW TO MAKE THIS RECIPE AHEAD OF TIME

Fresh is the key to the veal cutlets Milanese recipe. Prep the ingredients in advance but make the dish when you are ready to serve.

HOW TO STORE THIS RECIPE

Store the leftovers for a day or two in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

HOW TO FREEZE THIS RECIPE

It is not best to freeze this dish, fresh makes the dish special.

Frequently Asked Questions about Veal Milanese

HOW CAN I MAKE THIS DISH HEALTHIER?

Try using a gluten free bread crumb mixture. There are many available on the market today.

CAN I SUBSTITUTE SEASONING?

Of course, add some kosher salt and your Favorite Italian Seasoning Substitute.

CAN THIS RECIPE BE DOUBLED OR HALVED?

Indeed, this recipe is wonderful for a lovely dinner for two or for a crowd. Increase the recipe card below to the amount that you need.

HOW DO YOU MAKE TRADITIONAL VEAL MILANESE?

Fry Veal Milanese in clarified butter because it has a very high smoke point and therefore does not burn the meat, but makes it more flavorful and crispy. This is the traditional method for cooking the milanese.

HOW TO PICK THE BEST VEAL?

Veal is super nutritious and it is a wonderful cut of meal, find the information at Veal.org

A forkful of the veal.

Expert Tips for Making This Recipe

  • Extra Lemon Wedges: Serve the slice of meat with a drizzle of fresh lemon juice.
  • Season: Finish with fresh parsley, fresh basil or thyme.
  • Cheese: Add parmesan cheese to the panko breadcrumbs.
  • Alternate ingredient: Make veal chops Milanese with a bone-in veal chop. The USDA recommends cooking whole muscle veal cuts like veal steaks, roasts and chops to 145 degrees F (medium rare), 160 degrees F (medium), or 170 degrees F (well done).
  • Alternate cooking method tip: Air Fry at 400 on five minutes per side. Use a cooking spray on each side of the piece of veal.

What to Serve with Veal Milanese

Did you try this recipe?
Click below to leave a review and rating!

Veal Milanese

Veal Milanese

Yield: 4 servings
Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 12 minutes
Veal Milanese is a fried breaded veal cutlet that is crispy and tender and a classic dish from the Milan region of Italy. It is fast and easy dish that is also elegant and a beautiful dinner.
Print Recipe Pin Recipe Rate Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons Italian Seasoning Blend
  • 2 teaspoons All Purpose Seasoning Blend, divided
  • 4 Eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups Plain bread crumbs
  • 4 Veal cutlets, pounded thin
  • 1/4 cup Olive oil
  • 1 lemon, cut into wedges

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 200 degrees F.
  • Add flour and Italian Seasoning Blend to a shallow dish and stir together; Set aside.
  • Add eggs to another shallow dish and beat until fully combined; Set aside.
  • Pour breadcrumbs and 1 teaspoon of All Purpose Seasoning Blend into a third shallow dish; Set aside.
  • Season both sides of the veal cutlets with remaining teaspoon of All Purpose Seasoning Blend.
  • Dip each veal cutlet into the flour, coating both sides. Shake off any excess flour.
  • Then, dip each cutlet into the egg mixture, ensuring both sides are coated.
  • Last, dip each cutlet into the bread crumb mixture, ensuring both sides are fully coated. You may need to press the crumbs onto the veal. Set prepared cutlets on a plate.
  • Pour oil into a skillet over medium-high heat and heat it until the oil is shimmering.
  • Once oil is hot, add the veal, 2 cutlets at a time, and cook until cooked through, about 3-4 minutes per side.
  • Remove the veal to a rimmed baking sheet fitted with a wire rack and place in the preheated oven.
  • Repeat the process with the remaining cutlets.
  • Right before serving, squirt each cutlet with a lemon wedge.

Expert Tips

 
  • Extra Crispy Cutlets:  Swap the plain bread crumbs for Panko crumbs.  They finish crispier than traditional breadcrumbs.  I like to give them a spin the food processor for a finer texture.  
  • Extra Lemon Wedges: Serve with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.
  • Season: Finish with fresh parsley, fresh basil or thyme.
  • Cheese: Add parmesan cheese to the panko bread crumbs.
  • Alternate ingredient: Make veal chops milanese with a bone-in veal chops. The USDA recommends cooking whole muscle veal cuts like veal steaks, roasts and chops to 145 degrees F (medium rare), 160 degrees F (medium), or 170 degrees F (well done).
  • Alternate cooking method tip: Air fry at 400 on five minutes per side. Use a cooking spray on each side of the piece of veal.

Estimated Nutritional Information

Calories: 671kcal | Carbohydrates: 58g | Protein: 50g | Fat: 26g | Saturated Fat: 6g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 4g | Monounsaturated Fat: 14g | Trans Fat: 0.02g | Cholesterol: 296mg | Sodium: 468mg | Potassium: 875mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 298IU | Vitamin C: 14mg | Calcium: 170mg | Iron: 7mg
The nutritional information provided are estimates. To learn more about how I calculate this information go to www.itisakeeper.com/about-its-a-keeper/privacy-disclosure-policies/
PIN THIS RECIPE FOR LATER!Follow Me: @ItsAKeeperBlog or tag #itisakeeper
Course: Main Dish
Cuisine: Italian
Keyword: 30 minute meal

Recipes You Might Have Missed

Leave a Comment

Rate this Recipe